Pluralism and public choice

Government Public Choice theory and Pluralism are both expressions of an attempt to critique political structures, analyse the processes that drive them and understand their relative effectiveness in achieving stated political or social goals.

Pluralism and public choice

The following paper was written by Dr.

Pluralism and public choice

In the s and s we saw an explosion of new religious groups in America, many of which came to be labeled by their detractors as " cults. Further, since these were truly new religious movements, they all needed to grow and therefore to make converts, and they concentrated their conversion attempts upon young, idealistic, mostly white, and middle-class Americans.

That, of course, brought them into conflict with the young people's parents, who tried to bring legal pressures to bear against the new religions.

The parents of these converts, as well as the defenders of mainstream religions from whom the young people were defecting, had some hurdles to overcome in their fight against the "cults.

The answer they found was to claim that these were not "genuine" religious movements -- i. The "brainwashing" theory has important legal implications. After all, the religion clauses of the First Amendment forbid government from preferring some religions over others, and from interfering in a person's religious practice without a compelling reason.

Two s cases highlight the importance of the "brainwashing" theory. InRobin George and her mother brought suit against various groups and individuals associated with the International Society for Krishna Consciousness ISKCONclaiming, among other things, that they had falsely imprisoned Robin.

In section III attempt unsuccessfully to define a "cult. Section IV deals with medicalizing of a political issue. In section VI discuss the different and competing theories about why young people join "cults," and the implication of those theories for public policy responses.

Finally, in section VII conclude that none of the arguments which attempt to draw distinctions between "cults" and mainstream religions are solid enough to ground legal interventions against those who choose to join new religious movements.

According to the anti-cult Cult Awareness Networka cult is "a closed system whose followers have been unethically and deceptively recruited through the use of manipulative techniques of thought reform or mind control.

Most cults die before they get beyond this stage; others become more bureaucratized, as happened to Christianity. As we shall soon see, there is much disagreement even among the most strident anti-cultists as to which groups fit the category.The Philosophy of Social Science.

On the "Pro-Choice" Position on Abortion

The philosophy of social science can be described broadly as having two aims. First, it seeks to produce a rational reconstruction of social science. Pluralism and American Public Education No One Way to School.

Delivers a timely roadmap for American policymakers who are looking for a way to navigate choice, accountability, and equity in education amid a new administration “Berner has produced a lucid explanation and an extraordinarily compelling argument in favor of educational.

Public policies thus reflect the role of the state in trying to regulate the economy and ensure social and political stability. In other words, the state formulates and implements policy to reflect the interests of capitalism and the capitalist/ruling class.

Public Choice theory and Pluralism are both expressions of an attempt to critique political structures, analyse the processes that drive them and understand their relative effectiveness in achieving stated political or social goals.

Pluralism and public choice

2. Primary Objectives. Objective #1: To provide students with a general understanding of public policy and policy analysis by reading and discussing classic and contemporary literature. Political sociology is concerned with the sociological analysis of political phenomena ranging from the State, to civil society, to the family, investigating topics such as citizenship, social movements, and the sources of social power.

The lineage of this discipline is typically traced from such thinkers as Montesquieu, Smith and Ferguson through the "founding fathers" of sociology – Marx.

Rawls, John | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy